Professionals’ Questions and Answers – Guruji S N Goenkaji

Q: How can professionals, who have less time, practice meditation?
A: Meditation is all the more important for professionals! Those who are householders, who have responsibilities in life, need Vipassana much more, because they have to face situations in life where there are so many vicissitudes. They become agitated because of these vicissitudes. If they learn Vipassana, they can face life much better. They can make good decisions, right decisions, correct decisions, which will be very helpful to them. For professionals, executives, and other people with responsibilities, Vipassana is a great boon.

Source: The Gracious flow of Dhamma, for details visit: www.vridhamma.org

Vipassana is not intended for the enjoyment of pleasant sensations – Message from Guruji S N Goenkaji

I repeatedly warn students that Vipassana is not intended for the enjoyment of pleasant sensations, but despite my advice some of them make that their aim.

They think, I must get a free-flow of very pleasant vibrations.

If I’m not getting it, I’m not progressing.” They are completely wrong.

The equanimity you have developed is the measure of your progress.

The Buddha explained: To dig out the stock of your sankharas of craving, make use of the pleasant sensations;
to dig out the sankharas of aversion, make use of your unpleasant sensations.

Both types of sensation are equally important as tools to help us eradicate the deep-rooted sankharas that we have accumulated.
If you ignore this advice and instead feel depressed with gross sensations and elated with pleasant ones,
you are simply repeating what you have been doing your whole life and for so many lives.

In the name of Vipassana, you have started playing the same game.

Why Morning and evening daily sittings are very important in Vipassana – Message from Guruji S N Goenkaji

I must progress on the path and also encourage others to come to the path and progress on it.

You progress only when you maintain your practice morning and evening.

If you take courses, whether of ten, twenty or even thirty days, and you miss your daily meditation, you will not really benefit.

A course ought to strengthen your practice, your understanding of Dhamma at the experiential and intellectual level.

But only applied Dhamma will give real benefits.

If you do not practice morning and evening every day, you will notice that real progress is missing.

Morning and evening sittings are very important.