Keep in mind that equanimity is most important – Message from Guruji S N Goenkaji

Keep in mind that equanimity is most important for you. The type of sensation you feel doesnot matter.

Whenever a deep-rooted sankhara comes to the surface, it will produce a particular type of sensation, but don’t assume that every sensation you feel is because of a sankhara.

When you are meditating, it is true that most of the sensations are because of sankharas, but there are many other causes for sensations to arise.

Whatever the cause, if a sensation occurs and you don’t generate a new sankhara, the purpose is served: naturally the old accumulated stock will start to come up to the surface of the mind and be eradicated.

Professionals’ Questions and Answers – Guruji S N Goenkaji

Q: How can professionals, who have less time, practice meditation?
A: Meditation is all the more important for professionals! Those who are householders, who have responsibilities in life, need Vipassana much more, because they have to face situations in life where there are so many vicissitudes. They become agitated because of these vicissitudes. If they learn Vipassana, they can face life much better. They can make good decisions, right decisions, correct decisions, which will be very helpful to them. For professionals, executives, and other people with responsibilities, Vipassana is a great boon.

Source: The Gracious flow of Dhamma, for details visit: www.vridhamma.org

Message from Guruji S N Goenkaji for beginner on path of Dhamma

A beginner who starts on the path has to work. You are being taught to reach the stage that is without “I” (anattā), and when there is no “I” there is no doer. But if we say there is no “I” in the beginning, you could become confused and think you do not need to work. You must first understand, “Well, I have to take steps on the path.” A time will come when you understand, “There is a path but there is nobody to walk over it, there are only steps being taken on the path.” That stage has to come naturally. If the “I” is still there in you and you try to impose a feeling that the “I” is not there, it is not helpful.

That is why the Buddha’s teaching is to work first with anicca. When you get established in anicca, then dukkha will naturally become clear to you, and you will understand that however pleasant a feeling may be it passes away. If you develop attachment to it you will become miserable. So misery is inherent in even the most pleasant experience. Understanding of dukkha becomes more and more predominant once you are established in anicca. When you are established in anicca and dukkha, then the third stage—an understanding of anattā—develops, and you think, “What is this phenomenon? Where is ‘I’? Things are just happening, there is just a flow of mind and matter interacting.” When the “I” dissolves at the experiential level it is helpful. An imposed conception of anattā will not help. That is why the Buddha never advised us to start with anattā . Start with anicca,then dukkha will follow, and anattā will develop.

When Ramana Maharshi spoke of no doer, he spoke of anattā, the third, final stage. He must have reached that stage, so naturally he spoke about it to people who he felt were developed. But it does not mean that a beginner should start working in that way.”

– SN Goenkaji
From “For the Benefit of Many”

Executives’ Questions and Answers – Guruji S N Goenkaji

1. I am in a business where I could be my breaking sila. I know enough not to be involved in a business that is going to harm anyone. For instance, making missiles is certainly going to harm people; I obviously won’t do that. But what about the gray area where I am building a third-party product and I really don’t know where itÂ’’s going to end up. If I know it is going to be used to kill people, then it’s obviously not good. When I don’t know, then what?

Goenkaji:
You manufacture a knife and people use it to cut vegetables. But if someone uses it to murder somebody, thatÂ’s not your responsibility. If you sell a knife that you know is going to be used to kill somebody, then it’s wrong; otherwise, you have no intention of harming anyone.

2. So, as long as you don’t have the intention.

Goenkaji: Yes, that is more important.

3) Investing in the stock market—is that harmful or it is okay? Because my gain may be a loss to someone that I don’t even know.

Goenkaji: Well, if your intention is to harm somebody, then it is wrong. If you are just trying to earn some money, there’s nothing wrong in that.
But whatever you earn, then you have to pay attention to how you are using it. If it is just to inflate your ego—look, I am wealthier than everybody else, I am one inch taller than everybody else—then it is madness; those earnings are not helpful to you. When you earn money, that money is coming from the society; so it is your duty to share with the society. If you have that sort of volition, then earning is not bad. A householder has to earn. You are not a monk.

4) But somebody may begetting hurt.

Goenkaji: Well, you can’t help that. You are just trying to earn money. If you make use of this money in a properway,there is nothing wrong. Your intention is not to harm anyone. If you do something intentionally to hurt somebody, then it is wrong.

Vipassana is not intended for the enjoyment of pleasant sensations – Message from Guruji S N Goenkaji

I repeatedly warn students that Vipassana is not intended for the enjoyment of pleasant sensations, but despite my advice some of them make that their aim.

They think, I must get a free-flow of very pleasant vibrations.

If I’m not getting it, I’m not progressing.” They are completely wrong.

The equanimity you have developed is the measure of your progress.

The Buddha explained: To dig out the stock of your sankharas of craving, make use of the pleasant sensations;
to dig out the sankharas of aversion, make use of your unpleasant sensations.

Both types of sensation are equally important as tools to help us eradicate the deep-rooted sankharas that we have accumulated.
If you ignore this advice and instead feel depressed with gross sensations and elated with pleasant ones,
you are simply repeating what you have been doing your whole life and for so many lives.

In the name of Vipassana, you have started playing the same game.

Why Morning and evening daily sittings are very important in Vipassana – Message from Guruji S N Goenkaji

I must progress on the path and also encourage others to come to the path and progress on it.

You progress only when you maintain your practice morning and evening.

If you take courses, whether of ten, twenty or even thirty days, and you miss your daily meditation, you will not really benefit.

A course ought to strengthen your practice, your understanding of Dhamma at the experiential and intellectual level.

But only applied Dhamma will give real benefits.

If you do not practice morning and evening every day, you will notice that real progress is missing.

Morning and evening sittings are very important.